1

Jason Kanigan and Matthew North Sales Interview

Jason Kanigan and Matthew North have both been sales pros and trainers for years. Both have Amazon/Kindle books on the topic. And now, they've met for an in-depth discussion of sales approaches, success in sales, sales mindset, and more.

Join us for a truly transformative talk on how sales can be totally different for you and your prospect from the "Herb Tarlek from WKRP In Cincinnati" pushy, false enthusiasm-filled, say-anything-to-get-the-order beliefs and experience you likely had installed about selling as a kid.

Selling does not have to be pushy. Selling does not have to be about you. And selling does not have to be about trying to wrestle the prospect to the ground until they say "Uncle!" and buy.

Jason Kanigan and Matthew North Sales Interview

Jason Kanigan and Matthew North share their views on selling right here:
 

Jason Kanigan & Matthew North Sales Interview from Matthew North on Vimeo.

 
If you want to learn how to "be and do" sales differently, then listen up.

We discuss the subject of Authenticity at length in this interview. And ultimately there's nothing more important than your authenticity. Being it, expressing it, living it.

Jason Kanigan and Matthew North On Authenticity In Selling

If you're constantly trying to reshape yourself to please others in the hopes they'll buy, you aren't being authentic...and you won't be having genuine conversations with them. You won't be able to take the risks you must to get to the truth of things.

Selling can be about matching up problems with solutions.

Selling can be about listening rather than talking.

Selling can be about creating value wherever you go, rather than talking everyone you can into being a buyer and then dealing with highly uncomfortable buyer's remorse later on—or the Client From Hell, which is even worse.

Jason Kanigan and Matthew North Interview

Matthew's blog is here.

>> Jason Kanigan is a business strategy and conversion expert with many years of sales training experience. To discuss your concerns about your sales team or your own sales skills, book a call with Jason here. <<

0

Hard To Sell To?

Hard To Sell To: "Are {Insert Niche Here} hard to sell to?" is a common question I see; it was repeated again on an expert platform I'm a member of this morning.

The truth is that no industry is "hard to sell to."

hard to sell to wrestling block tackle pain hurt

If you are having trouble selling in a marketplace, an understanding of a key problem that niche has that you can fix is what you're missing.

Instead, odds are you're relying on pushing features of the product/service as most salespeople do. But I'll bet you're not even getting that far.

The problem that kills your prospecting process is more immediate.

Why Salespeople Say "This Industry Is Hard To Sell To"

I have trained many, many salespeople. These include so-called veterans with 20 or more years of experience in sales roles. Turned out they existed on soft referrals, though, and when times got tough and they had to start prospecting by phone, they quickly found themselves in trouble.

Two critical steps must be completed before any discussion with a prospect may be had that leads to a sale.

Your first step is to reach a decision maker.

Your second step is to start a conversation.

Most employed "salespeople" don't know how to do these two things.

If you can't reach a DM or start a conversation with them, what chances do you have of making a sale?

Is it any wonder salespeople say it's "hard to sell to" prospects in this niche?

You're not even getting that far—far enough to have a qualifying conversation!

Hard To Sell To: A Symptom of Larger Issues

I discuss these symptoms of a key problem further in this video:

Many large companies I've worked for didn't even have a consistent sales process, or any sales training materials. This is a rampant problem.

You would think sales organizations would have this all figured out, but the truth is they do not.

Customers don't buy because of features. If you want a better process, we should speak.

>> Jason Kanigan is a sales force developer and conversion expert. To book a call with Jason, click here.<<

1

State of Sales

state of salesState of Sales: I was recently asked on an expert platform what selling techniques, tools or trends we'll be seeing.

State of Sales Trend Number One: Personal Selling Skills are King

Personal selling skills, that is: an individual's ability to sell 1-on-1 in person or over the phone, are going to become noted as one of the most valuable skills in the marketplace. They already are in fact, but have not yet been held up as such.

Automated marketing has worn out its welcome: banner blindness, single digit email open rates, bland copy by a flood of inexpert writers...all have contributed to the end of pushbutton marketing's effectiveness. This may be acceptable as a lead generation tool, but when it comes to qualifying and selling, the return to personal selling, rather than the panacea of automated marketing promising to keep topic matter expert business owners safely away from the scary necessity of actually talking to people, is what will succeed going forward.

State of Sales Trend Number Two: Consultative Selling Skills In Complex Sales

I think we can agree that consultative selling has pushed out traditional features-and-benefits-based selling in the complex sale situation. Many brands of consultative selling exist but the essential process is the same. The learning issue seems to come down to finding and choosing a trainer you are comfortable with. This coach must not be the salesperson's boss, because telling the full truth to your boss can be a career-limiting move. Employees must feel free to share complete details of what is actually happening with their coach without fear of repriasal--or they won't get the benefit of coaching.

State of Sales Trend Number Three: Video Training for Repetitive, Global Concepts

For training, video is an excellent resource. When it comes to repetitive, non-individual-specific concepts and technical information which can be conveyed by automated knowledge transfer, video training is effective.

Business owners and executives are also finally arriving at the understanding that there is no quick fix for sales training. A short technical sales training seminar will not do the trick: employees may get a short term "rush", but in a couple weeks will be back in their old comfort zone and performance limitations. Sales training must be understood as an ongoing investment and process. Many months of consistent effort, training and experience are required even before one can say a salesperson has been sufficiently prepared to deal with the big bad world.

For larger sales forces, one or more dedicated trainers are necessary. If a company tries to have a sales manager who also has a personal revenue quota, that individual will likely fail because they cannot split their effort between selling and coaching.

I may return to this topic of the State of Sales as there is much more depth to explore in the current State of Sales. However, in the meantime, here are many interviews with sales industry experts you can listen to which echo what I've said.

>> My Superpower: "I will find the hidden profits in delivering your product or service to the customer." ~Jason Kanigan | Like this? Subscribe for new posts! <<

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.