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SaaS AdLabs Interview with Jason Kanigan

Interview With Jason Kanigan by Luis Camacho

SaaS AdLabs hosts this interview with Jason Kanigan on the unexpected challenges of scaling tech firms. We cover:

  • the biggest issues Cold Star sees over and over, in both small companies and larger firms, that block them from scaling smoothing and fast
  • Why franchising may be the wrong option for you, and the things you need to think about before considering using it as a growth tool
  • What tech firms can do to dramatically lower their cost of customer acquisition...and why nearly all founders cut themselves off from this possibility
  • Why all SaaS companies should have a dedicated individual which job is to figure out way to reduce churn rates.

Watch the full interview right here:

Process Engineering for Scaling Tech Firms

Business owners whose time is tied up, whose management team is stuck in a complex mire of training employees and outsourcing, who are tired of seeing quality issues that should have been fixed long ago...these folks are in a situation Cold Star Tech can get them out of. Process engineering is the key tool for accomplishing a better outcome, and getting business owners feeling confident that they have clarity.

interview with Jason Kanigan SaaS AdLab

>> Jason Kanigan is the founder of Cold Star Technologies, a professional services firm focused on helping tech and manufacturing companies smooth the bumpy road of scaling fast <<

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Perverse Incentives And Your Business

Perverse incentives are everywhere. I guarantee you've got at least one in your business right now.

ARE YOUR BUSINESS PROCESSES AS CRAZY AS THIS?

cambodia a book for people who find television too slow perverse incentives

I was talking about Cambodia: A Book for People Who Find Television Too Slow (NOT an affiliate link) and it triggered another memory.

This was another little European colonial adventure into darkest Africa. The name of the game was “Take The Rubber” so that natural resource could be used back in the civilized world. The Congo was divvied up between some corporate concessions and here’s where things start to get weird.

Perverse Incentives In The Belgian Congo

Some soldiers were required to account for every single bullet they’d been issued.

They either had to have the shell...or the hand of a native they’d presumably dispatched with said ammunition.

Humans being occasionally awful, you can see where this is headed.

Emil decides he wants rabbit for a late afternoon snack. Not being the greatest shot, he pops off three shells before hitting his target.

Let’s say The High Command is all right with the rabbit accounting for one of the shells. But the first two shots? Them bullets have to be accounted for somehow.

A lot of Congolese ended up walking around as amputees.

Logical. Right? The ultimate in Lawful Evil mentality, for you gamers.

Your Business And Perverse Incentives

My question for you today is: Are there processes in your business that are as nuts as some of those of the Belgian Congo? Are you measuring and creating results because of a robotic “If This Then That” conformity with loony premises? Is it time to make a change towards sanity?

Additional examples of perverse incentives are the:

  • Soviet era glass plant, first making too-thick and then too-thin glass, neither of which was useful to anyone but still satisfying the incentive structure
  • System that at first rewarded private firms transporting prisoners to Australia by the number of convicts loaded at departure, rather than those who arrived at the destination...leading to overcrowding and unnecessary deaths
  • time IBM attempted to produce more robust code by rewarding programmers by the line, which instead lead to bloated programs.

I describe a factory that produced a production scam with its piecework reward structure from my own experience in this podcast.

Government organizations such as the US Department of Veterans Affairs are not exempt from claims of perverse incentives.

Perverse incentives are particularly common in sales compensation programs.

Frankly, if you think your system is "too good for" or somehow exempt from perverse incentives, you probably aren't looking hard enough.

>> Jason Kanigan is a business strategist trained in operations improvement methodologies. To book a time to discuss your situation with Jason, click here. <<

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Jason Kanigan on LegacyCast

What does "legacy" mean? Host James Snow interviews Jason Kanigan on LegacyCast, the podcast about leaving a legacy.

jason kanigan on legacycast podcast interview

Podcast Interview: Jason Kanigan on LegacyCast

We get into a conversation first defining "legacy" for me, then move into instances of legacy-creating in my life so far. Civic volunteer experience with my home town, what I've done since moving 3000 miles to another country, and then legacies I'd like to build. Listen right here:

Jason Kanigan on LegacyCast Will Make You Think About Your Own Legacy

This interview will get you thinking about your own legacy. And for the record, as I share at the start of the podcast, I do not consider leaving a business as an inheritance a legacy. Especially as a business owner, it's easy to get caught up in the idea you're building and forget about legacy.

>> Jason Kanigan is a business strategist. To book a call with Jason, click here <<